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text - text Assemblywoman Death Shrouded in Mystery

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- City Politician Apparently Leaps to Her Death

- Politician’s Kin Target Soka Gakkai

- Soka Gakkai Files Complaint Against Weekly

- Q & A With President Akiya

- Police: Assemblywoman Committed Suicide

- Disbandment Request Filed Against Soka Gakkai

- Soka Gakkai Slag Far From the Truth

- Kodansha Loses Soka Gakkai Suit

Courts Rule Against Weeklies, Asaki Families in Higashi Murayama Libel Suits

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- Shukan Gendai Apologizes to Soka Gakkai

Soka Gakkai Wins the Case Completely

- Tokyo District Court Gives a Crushing Blow
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The Japan Times
Nov. 25, 1995

Relatives and colleague of a Tokyo area assemblywoman who died mysteriously in September filed Friday for a court order for Soka Gakkai to disband, claiming the lay Buddhist group deviates from the religious purposes stated in its registration document.

Akiko Asaki, a politician in Higashi-Murayama and a vocal critic of Soka Gakkai, fell to her death Sept. 2 from the fifth floor stairs of a building in the city. Police ruled that the death was a suicide.

Asaki’s daughter, Naoko Asaki, 28, her husband Daito Asaki, 57, and Higashi-Murayama assemblyman Hozumi Yano, 48, believe she was murdered.

“This disbandment request (with the Tokyo District Court) is the first counteroffensive from the side of the murdered,” Yano said at the news conference.

Soka Gakkai officials did not comment on the disbandment request because they have yet to see it. But a spokesman for the group said it considers the trio’s claim absurd.

The daughter and husband accused Soka Gakkai of murdering Asaki in the Sept. 23 issue of the weekly Shukan Gendai, prompting the Buddhist group to file a defamation complaint with the Metropolitan Police Department against the family and the editor of the weekly.

The late Asaki was to attend a symposium on Soka Gakkai in Kochi Prefecture on Sept. 3, but died the day before.

In their news conference in Tokyo, the three claimants said that although Soka Gakkai states that it follows the teachings of the Buddhist sect Nichiren Shoshu, it actually has not done so for at least three years.

Nichiren Shoshu expelled Soka Gakkai in November 1991 allegedly because it violated the sect’s teachings, and dismissed Soka Gakkai’s leader, Daisaku Ikeda, and other top heads from its membership in August 1992, the claimants said.

The claimants also said Soka Gakkai has engaged in seven illegal activities, including interfering with publications and acts of violence and injury that are harmful to the public welfare.

Yano said he predicts the allegations spelled out in the disbandment request will pose problems for Soka Gakkai when it seeks reapproval under the Religious Corporation Law, whose revision is currently being debated by the Diet.


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